Painting Indoor Ceilings

So here we find ourselves looking at our ceilings thinking how should we fix a problem that re-appears over time. We will be looking at seven different ceiling substrates and how to fix and paint them.

New:  Prime all bishop strips and nail heads with one coat Panache Universal undercoat. On all new ceiling boards apply one coat Artisan plaster primer followed by two coats of Panache Super Acrylic White. If the ceiling is in the kitchen or bathroom, use two top coats of either a Panache Eggshell or Panache Polyglo (Solvent based, or water based).

 

Previously Painted and Sound:  Clean surface with a scouring pad and sugar soap solution. Leave to dry. Apply two coats of Panache Super Acrylic White. If the ceiling is in the kitchen or bathroom, apply one coat Panache Universal undercoat and then use two top coats of either a Panache Eggshell or Panache Polyglo (Solvent based, or water based).

 

Mould:  Scrub ceiling with a scouring pad and mould buster solution. Rinse with clean water and leave to dry. Apply two coats Panache Primercure (Leave 18 hours in between coats). Then use two top coats of either a Panache Eggshell or Panache Polyglo (Solvent based, or water based).

 

Leak Stain:  First find and stop the leak. Leave surface to dry. Once the surface is dry scrub surface with a scouring pad and sugar soap solution. Rinse with clean water and leave to dry. Apply one coat Panache Universal undercoat, followed by two coats of Panache Super Acrylic White. If the ceiling is in the kitchen or bathroom, apply one coat Panache Universal undercoat and then use two top coats of either a Panache Eggshell or Panache Polyglo (Solvent based, or water based).

 

Flaking:  Scrape all loose bits with a 75mm scraper. Sand surface with 120 grit sand paper. Wash surface with a sugar soap solution. Rinse with clean water and leave to dry. Apply one coat Panache Primercure.  Then apply two coats of Panache Super Acrylic White. If the ceiling is in the kitchen or bathroom, apply one coat Panache Universal undercoat and then use two top coats of either a Panache Eggshell or Panache Polyglo (Solvent based, or water based).

 

Red Rust Bleed:  Sand rusting areas with scouring pad and liquid sugar soap solution. Rinse with clean water. Apply two coats Panache Anti-corrosive grey metal primer.  Then apply two coats of Panache Super Acrylic White. If the ceiling is in the kitchen or bathroom, apply one coat Panache Universal undercoat and then use two top coats of either a Panache Eggshell or Panache Polyglo (Solvent based, or water based).

 

Yellowing:  Scrub surface with scouring pad and sugar soap solution. Rinse with clean water and leave to dry. Apply one coat Panache Universal undercoat. Then apply two coats of Panache Super Acrylic White. If the ceiling is in the kitchen or bathroom, apply one coat Panache Universal undercoat and then use two top coats of either a Panache Eggshell or Panache Polyglo (Solvent based, or water based).

 

Happy Painting!

Splash of colour

 

The term splash of colour refers to the effect of the use of a coloured item on an otherwise monochrome image to draw extra attention to the item. It has been used frequently in films as a form of emphasis.

It adds a bold splash of colour to all kinds of things, and turns everyday items into creative looking items.

Hope this makes you think of some creative colour uses, do find them at your nearest Jack’s Paint and Hardware store.

Colour and You

Colour therapy, also knows as chromo-therapy, uses the benefits of different colours and shades to affect your well being. As each colour has a unique light wavelength, the colour therapy principles use the energy of each shade to boost your mental and physical health.

Colour and your body

Chromo-therapy practitioners believe that each colour relates to an area of the body:

 

Red

Red and pink colours are linked to your blood, circulation and breathing. Use these colours to raise your pulse, blood pressure and the speed that you breathe, and strengthen your veins.

Yellow

Yellow is linked to your skin and tissues, mainly your digestive system, metabolism and nervous system. It can be used to strengthen your body, treat asthma and bronchitis, and help with skin problems.

 

Green

Green colours have a harmonious, calming effect. Green can be used to fight infection and as an antiseptic.

Blue

Blue also encourages relaxation and calm, so can be used to treat all types of pain (especially stomach and muscle pain) as well as headaches, colds, tension and stress.

Purple

Indigo colours are beneficial for problems with the eyes, ears and nose, while more violet shades of purple with a pink tone can help relax your muscles and nervous system. Violet colours are also useful when meditating.

Colour psychology

Colours can influence how someone thinks, feels and behaves, so we can use colour to boost well being and morale. Using a palette of colours that you resonate with, you’re likely to feel good and help support long-term positive behaviours.

Trust your own colour intuition. Explore the colours you love – you might not know why, but if you love them and they make you feel good then use them. You’ll want different colours at different times of the day and week. We warn you against following the colours your friends use, or which are in fashion – colours are completely personal.

Happy Painting!

When we think of colour, we always seam to think bright and dark, this is because Colour excites the eye and can make any space interesting as well as personal, this doesn’t mean you have to paint the walls. There are benefits to having white walls, white keeps a room feeling bright and clean, and is a required Colour to make other Colours visually stunning.

Pay attention to tiny detail. Accent splashes with your favourite colour and see how the room gets transformed and comes alive. This technique could be used on the ceiling the doors and even free standing cupboards. #Coverkote Hi-hiding has some extra ordinary colours to use when you require splashes of colour, and so will not break the bank.

When placing splashes of colour around the room, we find focal points that draw our attention, making it easy to change our colour schemes as the seasons change.

Happy Painting!

Since February has rolled in, you’ve probably started noticing how everything you see seems to come in shades of red and pink. Dependent on your culture, red and pink are probably colours that represent passion, love, or lust. This non-verbal communication is probably something you haven’t ever questioned, so, we ask you this: what makes these colours different from blue or green?

The answer is your mind, but of course, there are many theories as to why you choose to associate red with love. Red is the colour of blood and the body; essentially, you’re falling in love with someone’s mind and body, and the colours of the human body come in many shades. All of them equally as beautiful as the next. This is why it also the colour and passion and of power.

However, to many people, green is also seen as a colour of love. As soon as you step outside, you’re enveloped by green; from the grass to the trees. Many people choose to bring green into their homes, too, by introducing plants. These indoor plants help to remove pollutants from the air, and it’s been said that this aids in stress relief and also helps to maintain your health. It’s hard to argue that green isn’t a colour of love when it promotes harmony, relaxation, and well-being.

But, let’s not forget about blue. It can’t be argued that nature doesn’t provide the ultimate in stress relief, and why so many people are drawn to spending time outside. As Sylvia Plath said: “I felt my lungs inflate with the onrush of scenery- air, mountains, trees, people. This is what it is to be happy.” Find your primary colour of love; use it, live it, embrace it.

Be sure to bring the colours of love into your home with our paint specialists, who can mix your colours of love – bit.ly/2fEwErI.

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THINK PINK! Literally, though! Pink is the perfect colour to think about when you are in a mental slump and you can’t let go of that one thing that just nags at the back of your mind.

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This colour enables us to ‘let go’. On a physical & mental level, it allows us to let go of ideas and thought patterns which are no longer right for us. If we hold on to ideas and conditioning which originated in our childhood and/or adolescence, we become rigid and static, no longer able to grow and evolve.

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When magenta fades into a very pale pink, it becomes the colour of spiritual love. This is mainly used on the emotional aspect of a person. For example, someone who is suffering from a ‘broken heart’ would choose this colour.

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Enticing and calming, the colour blue leaves us with some of our earliest memories learning things at an early age like the sky is blue and is specific to the male gender. But the colour also has a deeper psychological meaning.

Blue is said to be the most conducive to a good night’s sleep. Blue creates a sensation of space, and because of this it is said to be a cold colour. A paper to be presented at the Annual Colour Conference in Thailand in 2004 had subjects in a red and a blue room with the thermostat turned down in the same increments and all subjects found that they perceived the blue room to be colder sooner than the red room!

The actual temperature, however, is not influenced by the colour itself. Blue is a colour, which slows things down and gives the impression of expansion. Because of this, a room painted in this colour will appear to be much larger.

If however, you have a problem waking up! Yellow (Y10R TO Y30R) would be the colour to use in your room to best simulate the happy feeling of the early morning sun.

A Confident and joyful colour, yellow has the power to brighten up your day. From canary yellow to mustard yellow, we explore the meaning behind this diverse and gleeful colour.

Yellow is the symbol of the mind and intellect. It represents the power of thought and stimulates mental activity.

Yellow rays carry positive magnetic currents, which are inspiring and stimulating. They strengthen the nerves and stimulate higher mentality. The colour activates the motor nerves in the physical body, thereby generating energy in the muscles.

If you have a problem waking up it’s the best colour to have in your bedroom. But don’t use this if you have any problems sleeping rather look at the colours on the R60B spectrum of the NCS colour system.


Picture this: you are basking in the beautiful, orange light of a beach sunset. The air cool on your skin and everything around you is illuminated. You are feeling energised and at peace. Why? ORANGE. A colour that lies midway between the red and the yellow ray, and therefore, influences both physical vitality and intellect.

Vibrant and bright, orange is the symbol of feminine energy, the energy of creation. It is more gentle than the dynamic, masculine energy of red but its energy is complementary to the red energy. It is, therefore, important that these two colours should work in harmony.

Orange is the colour of joy and happiness and enables us to create a balance between our physical and mental bodies. It gives freedom to thoughts and feelings, and disperses heaviness, allowing the body natural, joyful movements.

“Orange is an appetite stimulant, and is seen as a universal healer that can counteract depression and humorlessness (Vernolia, 1988).”

Orange brings about changes in the biochemical structure, resulting in the dispersing of depression. This makes it a good colour to use with people who are manic-depressive or suicidal.

It is also been found to have wonderful pain reducing properties, so reach for the orange t-shirt before you take that headache tablet!

Written by: Lisa Taylor, NCS South Africa.

What’s Your Favourite Colour?

This is a question you’ve been asked all your life and, as humans do, you’ve probably changed your mind a fair few times. But, have you ever put any more thought into just why blue is your favourite colour? Or why that particular shade of green seems to put your mind at ease? The answer, of course, lies in your mind.

Colours can affect every aspect of your thoughts, feelings, and emotions. Red may make you feel on-edge or energised, while yellow can make you feel anxious, and blue can calm you down. There’s a reason that the rooms of your doctor are never splashed in warm colours like red or orange, but rather soft, soothing pastels like blue and green. Welcome to the psychology of colour.

Think of black– I’m sure it brings to memory periods of mourning or menace; quite the opposite to what the Ancient Egyptians thought black represented: life and rebirth. While you’re reading this, try not to be swayed by what you have been exposed to culturally, but rather how these colours affect you. The fashion world idolises black, and perhaps always will, as it is seen as a colour that looks good on everyone. But, ask a fashionista for a few tips on looking powerful the next time you walk into a business meeting, and they’ll suggest an item of clothing drenched in red. Why, you may ask? Red is both an exciting colour and an aggressive one; it evokes strong emotions, and so, makes the wearer seem more powerful. Are you rethinking your wardrobe choices yet?

On the other hand, we have blue, a colour that we are exposed to in abundance. The minute you set foot outside you’re met with blue skies; a day on the beach features both blue skies and an incredible expanse of blue sea. How do you feel? Calm? That’s the point. We can’t deny that nature provides us with what we need to maintain our sanity. On par with blue, green evokes feelings of peace and balance. As a child, weren’t your favourite moments spent outside, playing in the grass?

Colour psychology also suggests that people work better in spaces specifically designed to make them work better. Walk into an accounting firm and take a look around: white, black, grey, and the occasional hint of brown. Now, walk into an advertising agency: RED, BLUE, GREEN, PINK, YELLOW… You get the point.

When it take it down to bare bones, yes, colour has an effect on you psychologically, but just remember that not everyone’s minds are wired the same way.

Stay tuned weekly, as we break down the meaning of each primary colour this month.